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You really, really wanna watch this

You really, really wanna watch this

July 8, 2016

It is 20 years since the Spice Girls released their breakthrough hit Wannabe. And Ealing Town Hall played a key role in a special remaking of the video recently which was released to coincide with the anniversary of the original. You can watch the video here.

Ealing Town Hall was one of a handful of sets chosen from around the world – it is not hard to spot in the video, if you have ever visited the town hall. Filming was arranged with the help of the council’s West London Film Office.

The video was made by Project Everyone, in partnership with Getty Images and SAWA, the global cinema advertising association, and featured artists from India, Nigeria, South Africa, UK, USA and Canada.  The idea was to tell global leaders what women ‘really, really want’: Namely, global awareness of gender inequalities and improving the conditions for women across the world.

It was done to mark the first anniversary of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. These global goals are an ambitious and wide-ranging plan to end poverty, fix climate change and address inequalities over the next 15 years.

‘Posh Spice’ Victoria Beckham said: ‘I think this film is a wonderful idea. How fabulous it is that after 20 years, the legacy of the Spice Girls -­ ‘Girl Power’ -­ is being used to encourage and empower a whole new generation?”

UK girl group MO, who appear in the video in the Ealing Town Hall scenes and are pictured (courtesy of Getty Images), said: “It’s crazy that in 2016, women in the UK still earn on average 20% less than men. What we really, really want is for women to receive the pay they deserve and an equal opportunity to thrive. The global goals offer a framework to achieve this. When women fulfil their potential everyone benefits.”

Famous film director and writer Richard Curtis was part of the project, too. As was Bollywood actress Jacqueline Fernandez, who appeared in the video. She said: “Gender discrimination has to stop and the global community has to start putting girls first. We need to create a community where girls feel strong, safe and supported and have equal access to education, technology, health and sanitation. The world needs a dose of girl power.”

Line producer Lucy Tate thanked the staff of Ealing Town Hall – in particular security guard Martin Tulit, who stayed late until 2am to allow the film crew to finish when they were against the clock.

She said: “I really must say that none of this would never have happened without Martin. Honestly, the film would never have been completed and all of this worthy work for charity would have been wasted.

“As is the nature of the filming beast, certain lighting and make-up issues held us up on the evening, we were overrunning far longer than we anticipated. But Martin was so fair and understanding. He wanted to ensure we captured the shot, he was alert and unbelievably professional. His patience in letting us film so late into the morning enabled this film to happen. We are truly, incredibly grateful.”