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Remembering workers who have given everything

Remembering workers who have given everything

Like many of you, I stopped what I was doing this morning (Tuesday, 28 April) and joined the nation in a minute’s silence to remember all of those NHS, care and key workers who have tragically lost their lives to coronavirus.

It was a poignant moment to reflect on those who have lost their lives as they have courageously and selflessly served others.

I remembered doctors, nurses, other hospital workers and other NHS workers who have given their lives, as they have tried to save and care for others.

Also I remembered all of the care workers, in our care homes and nursing homes, and those who visit our elderly relatives in their home to give them their vital care.

I also remembered those key workers, like bus drivers, who have lost their lives in London and served to keep those vital services going throughout this pandemic.

Also, it gave me a moment to think about the fact that many of those who have lost their lives are from black, Asian, minority and ethnic communities, who keep some of those vital services and our NHS going. We need to find out why they are more susceptible to coronavirus and must do everything we can to protect our BAME communities going forward.

All of those who have lost their lives, we owe a huge debt of gratitude to. And, also, I would like to offer my sincerest sympathies and condolences to the friends and families of all of those key workers and NHS and care workers who have lost their lives to coronavirus.

As we honour and remember their memory we need to make sure we are doing everything to stop this virus and also stop a resurgent second wave.

To do this we need to follow the rules on social distancing and self-isolation and, above all, stay at home. As we do this we will protect our NHS, and save lives.

Council leader Julian Bell
Council leader Julian Bell