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COVID infection rates and Black History Month

COVID infection rates and Black History Month

This morning, I observed the minute’s silence to remember Metropolitan Police Sergeant Matt Ratana, who was so brutally shot and killed a week ago in the police custody suite in Croydon, says council leader Julian Bell in this latest coronavirus update video message (above). My sincere condolences are extended to Sergeant Ratana’s family, colleagues and friends.

This week’s COVID infection rates show a sizeable increase, which is partly to do with both rising numbers of tests being done and also the increasing transmission of the virus in Ealing, London and the country as a whole.

For the seven days up to 27 September, there were 158 new cases – that’s 46.2 per 100,000 of population. That’s a rise from the week before figure of 26.9 per 100,000. Although, we knew that figure was significantly undercounting the number of people infected with the virus.

Testing capacity is rising but there may still be undercounting going on. The R number is rising and we also know there are increased hospital admissions and consultations with GPs and NHS 111 for COVID-19 symptoms.

We’ve opened a new testing facility in the Michael Flanders Centre car park in Acton, to add to the Featherstone Terrace car park testing centre in Southall and the mobile testing unit at Gurnell Leisure Centre car park. If you experience any COVID symptoms, please get a test and make sure you self-isolate while you wait for the result. And, again, after a positive test result make sure you isolate along with members of your household.

I have another meeting on Monday with other council leaders and the Mayor (of London) to discuss what, if any, further actions need to be taken in response to this continued increase in infection rates. In the meantime, we all need to redouble our efforts to stop the spread of the virus by following the hands, face, space and ‘rule of six’ messages. It’s really critical if we’re to keep Ealing safe and save lives.

Finally, I want to end on a message about Black History Month that we are celebrating this October. It is a time to reflect on achievements and celebrate our diversity, especially in Ealing. However, after the events of this year, it is a time to reflect and discuss how we create a fairer and more just society for all.

Council leader Julian Bell
Council leader Julian Bell

Further details of Black History Month 2020 can be found on the Black History Month website.